Rock, Singer-songwriter

The Sounds, Style And Life Of Lady Geraldine

 

 

Drawing inspiration from the likes of Stevie Nicks to Don Henley, Lady Geraldine is a fresh face to the classic rock scene, but has carried her style and repertoire of sophistication through to her music.

Lady Geraldine’s style can be seen as a mix from different artist’s, as well as drawing from her cultural experiences and own personal life. Travelling around, from starting in England, to then moving to North Africa, to then residing in Venezuela in South America, Lady Geraldine has definitely gained a wide range of attributes from each place and time.In her music, there is a sense of wisdom, that comes with the passing of time, as well as a relatable theme, that draws from things such as love and emotion.

Lady Geraldine Elliot, 8th, September, 2017

Lady Geraldine now lives in Edinburgh, where she writes and records her own original material. But is also very professionally active, she works on oil paintings, as well as jewellery designs, which are down to her business savvy, letting the music explore the emotional and creative side.

She is set to release her new album ‘Little Miss Blue’, the single that goes by the same name, is also available on Soundcloud and her website.

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-666459112/sets/little-miss-blue

Website: www.aero-records.com

 

 

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Alternative, Singer-songwriter

Eels- “Electro-Shock Blues” Review

In a 1999 CNN interview Mark Oliver Everett, the creative motor and sole permanent member of Eels, described “Electro-Shock Blues”, with dry gallows humour, as “the party album of the year”. This was perhaps gently over-stating things by a light-year or two. Following the critical and commercial success of Eels’ 1996 debut “Beautiful Freak”, the band’s nascent fame was promptly derailed by a string of personal tragedies for Everett that are far too deeply saddening to delve into thoroughly here, basically comprising of the deaths of his remaining immediate family.

It was this deep well of sorrow that Everett was to plumb on “Electro-Shock Blues”, its title a reference to his sister’s electroconvulsive therapy. The album catalogues virtually every facet of human suffering, from the giddy paranoia of “Going to Your Funeral Part I” to the hideously pretty and almost unbearably desolate title track. On a musical level, the use of plinking xylophones and tinny music boxes—for instance, on the Beach Boys-esque “Baby Genius”—signifies a regression into a numbed, distorted childhood, which jars incongruously with the natural weariness and grain of Everett’s voice.

Although its intimately personal idiosyncrasy is inherently resistant to placement in a wider musical context, “Electro-Shock Blues” is truly the “difficult second album” amplified to almost farcical proportions. Everett, who surprisingly and laudably retained his self-deprecating sense of humour, is prone to droll, blackly funny quips about this. On “3 Speed” he remarks, dry as the Sahara, “Life is funny, but not ha-ha funny/Peculiar, I guess”. This deepens into the hard-won, utilitarian optimism of “Last Stop: This Town” which opens, with wonderfully deadpan flatness, “You’re dead, but the world keeps spinning”. The song is the album’s triumph, spinning pure, joyous pop of abject dejection. Especially in contrast to the songs that precede it, “Last Stop: This Town” attains a glorious transcendence, both physically and emotionally: “Why don’t we take a ride away up high through the neighbourhood? Up over the billboards and the factories and smoke?”

“Electro-Shock Blues” is an album inseparable from grief, but one that is ultimately about progression. As Everett enthused with startling candour in the aforementioned interview, “I started to get excited about it creatively, because I felt I could tie my own experience together and make it meaningful to everyone.” Whether you’re just on safari or know the sleepless nights and vodka bottles first-hand, the album is an uplifting assertion of the essential durability of character. From the maniacal samba of “Hospital Food” to the wistful lushness of “Going to Your Funeral Part II”, “Electro-Shock Blues” is a lost masterpiece of unflinching introspection. Drink it in. If he can stand it, you can. Perhaps it really is a party album. CO

A+

Listen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TfqbuTBqX8

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Pop, Prog-Rock, Singer-songwriter

Steven Wilson- “To the Bone” Review

Despite a career spanning more than 30 years, you probably don’t know who Steven Wilson is. Described by The Daily Telegraph as “the most successful British artist you’ve never heard of”, he rose to relative prominence as frontman of the band Porcupine Tree, as well as working with a plethora of storied bands playing prog or off-kilter pop, from King Crimson to Tears for Fears. However, the cover of “To the Bone”, his fifth solo album (although he has produced endless work through other names and projects) implies a literal and figurative stripping down. Rather than the studiedly moody Porcupine Tree album covers, here a shirtless Wilson is simply lit blue against a red backdrop in a repudiation of his previous tetchiness about publicity.

In some ways, “To the Bone” does seem to amalgamate all his divergent creations and influences: for instance, in dazzling highlight “Refuge” there are echoes of Rush in Wilson’s soft vocals—Geddy Lee but less shrill—or perhaps Tool in the mechanised, vaguely Eastern clatter. However, “Permanating” is weirdly reminiscent of ABBA at times, illuminating an underbelly of pure pop that intermittently surfaces throughout “To the Bone”. The album also strays into fleet-footed metal at times in the maniacal, jazzy riffing that concludes “Detonation”, or the trebley bite of “People Who Eat Darkness”, whose riff’s similarity to that of Metallica’s “The Memory Remains” is difficult to ignore.

However, this constant genre-hopping proves surprisingly stylistically durable. Even the broody Depeche Mode affectations of “Song of I” dovetail into typically maximalist string swells, snapping the song cleanly into the album’s track listing. The exception to this rule is the arpeggiated restraint of “Blank Tapes”, whose resemblance to Pink Floyd’s “Brain Damage” isn’t too tenuous given Wilson’s prog credentials. The track is a welcome avenue of quiet prettiness, coming off more like “Ghost”-era Devin Townsend than the glittering bombast of “The Same Asylum as Before”, which balloons from tastefully bluesy soloing into a scalding climax somewhere between A Perfect Circle and The Chameleons.

However, despite the musical smorgasbord Wilson unveils, his undeniable technical skill sometimes struggles to gloss over a dearth of emotional engagement. The album’s lyrical opacity occasionally gives way to bland sloganeering: “I float above the stars, and I feel the rush of love” he gaudily declares on “Nowhere Now”. Nonetheless, “To the Bone” is largely carried by its musicianship, which is thankfully and necessarily excellent. Wilson’s virtuosity electrifies the album, providing it with its integral heft and invention. However, it is maybe this slightly alienating reliance upon technical ability that keeps Steven Wilson as “the most successful British artist you’ve never heard of”. Or then again, maybe he just likes it better that way. CO

B+

Listen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0dLypToLzE

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Alternative, Indie, Rock, Rock and Roll, Singer-songwriter

Whiskey-fuelled rockers Albino give us new single ‘Belinda’

Old school rock and roll may be a dying art in these modern times but the London based band Albino are looking to cast this misconception aside, whiskey in hand.

The alcoholic beverage has a big part to play in the band’s journey to date as they aim to entertain with their raucous, often humorous ‘drinking’ music.  It’s the kind of musical recipe that would make Johnny Cash proud, but would equally strike a note with fans of Tom Waits, The Animals, The Doors and children of the ’60’s ‘flower-power’ generation.

 

 

Their latest track ‘Belinda’ exudes this throwback, vintage feel that sounds like it could have come straight out of the 60’s.

The band made up of Ben Tucker (guitar/vocals), Merv ‘Fuzzy’ Salole (Bass), Gareth ‘gwEM’ Morris (guitar) and Don Gibson (percussion). As the main songwriter in the outfit, Ben is the driving inspirational force, tapping into a deep well of life experiences that draw on topics as diverse as love, deviancy, distrust of priests, historical events and of course, drinking.

Since they began in 2005, Albino has undergone a musical metamorphosis, travelling a long way from their humble beginnings, but now, the off-the-wall band has cemented their style and truly found their own sound. Whilst Albino’s eclectic and multi-talented musical line up has changed over the years, this latest track proves their musical direction, commitment and energy has always remained constant. AP

Check out more of Albino’s stuff here:

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/Albinomusic/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYeh0Lung8nhaCa1Zb5W8cw

http://www.albinomusic.com/index.php

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Electronic, Singer-songwriter

Voldo Blanka- “Go Your Way” Review

Voldo Blanka is a musical puzzlebox. A musician with experience of over a dozen instruments, interestingly it was the mechanistic washes of sound of electronica that attracted him rather than the squalling muso noodlings of modern jazz or metal. His presentation is restricted to a handful of monochrome photo shoots of him archly peering into the middle distance, and he is absent from the “Go Your Way” video, delegating visual intrigue a troupe of plain-clothes dancers and the decaying underpasses of Los Angeles. Rather than avidly marketing himself, his work is a process of withdrawal and retraction from the public eye.

This is also reflected in his music, which strikes an uneasy balance of melancholic emotion and glacial detachment, exemplified literally in the robotic vocoder vocals that underlay his own.  “Go Your Way” is a surprisingly coherent hybrid of various styles: Philip Glass-esque piano arpeggios, glints of post-rock outfits like Hammock (particularly their song “Tonight We Burn Like Stars That Never Die”) and Explosions in the Sky, clicking percussion reminiscent of Björk’s “Vulnicura” and those synthesised vocals which evoke modern hip-hop and R&B. This impersonal and clinical genre cherry-picking dryly underlays the song’s wistful positivity—“today’s the day”, “you’re on your way up”—as does the grand, shoegaze-influenced production.

If the “Go Your Way” has flaws, they are primarily derived from its anonymity. Voldo Blanka is playing one-handed, afraid to fully commit, and thus the air of stately detachment which pervades “Go Your Way” punctures genuine emotional involvement. However, it is an intriguing introduction to a new artist with a distinctive sound and compelling aesthetic. CO

B

Listen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16ddIO5u4BQ

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Pop, Rock, Singer-songwriter

‘Freedom – What does the word even mean?’ – Beldon Haigh’s protest song

How often do you hear a protest song? Not very, I would say is the case for most people, but in reaction to America’s new president, Mr. Donald Trump, Beldon Haigh has written an anti-trump protest song to empower all those voices who feel the same way.

Supposedly, the idea for the song came to Beldon in a dream, so he was quick to jot down his ideas when he woke up. Beldon used to play in bands back in the 80s such as Mikifin and Boxing Clever and has since honed his craft as a musician, culminating to this point where he has found that writing songs of protest is where his heart lies.

Combining simple, yet effective songwriting with pertinent lyrics that make their way straight to the point, Beldon’s style is no fuss music for the 21st century, formed using classic instrumentation and pop-influenced hooks.

However, Beldon is also influenced by the likes of The Waterboys, Tears For Fears, Bob Dylan and James Taylor, displaying a strong musical pedigree that is clear when you listen to the music.

 

Find out more on Beldon Haigh here:

Links:

https://twitter.com/beldonhaigh

https://www.facebook.com/Beldon-Haigh-Freedom-An-Anti-Trump-Protest-Song-1270990246327550/?fref=ts

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/freedom/id1195525999?i=1195526008

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Rock, Singer-songwriter

James Kennedy’s New Album ‘Home’

Experienced musician James Kennedy has gone solo with his latest record ‘Home’, after years of touring with bands. As front-man of Welsh hardcore-rock group, Kyshera, James has shared stages with big names such as The Stereophonics and has performed for many a sold-out crowd.

The rock and roll lifestyle might seem all glitz and glamour, but the incessant touring took its toll on James, leaving him feeling severely depressed. Consequently, he decided to take a break and it was during this time that Kennedy formed ‘Home’. James turned to what he was good at: songwriting, and this was what helped him through some difficult times.It wasn’t long before ‘Home’ was fully recorded and mastered, but James’ album won’t be out until March 31st.

Since diverging from Kyshera and their aggressive rock sound, James has adopted a more melodic and easy-listening rock style for his solo material. Despite this, there are still elements of classic rock in his music, including powerful solos and memorable chord structures.

Kennedy had serious hearing problems as a child, resulting in 3 major surgeries and the fear of permanent hearing loss always present. This led to his school life being interrupted, developing his ability for self learning, which he applied to learning guitar, vocals, piano, bass and music production. The entirely self taught musician was soon accepted to Welsh College of Music & Drama where he developed his skills further, before working in a recording studio, which he used to form his own label Konic Records.

Titled the 32nd sexiest man in Wales, James Kennedy doesn’t just have soulful raspy vocals and a dynamic performance style. Drawing similarities with Prince, The Script and Paolo Nutini, ‘Home’ reflects Kennedy’s journey of depression from dark to light.

Links:

www.jameskennedystuff.com

www.instagram.com/JamesKennedyUK

www.youtube.com/user/jameskennedystuff

www.twitter.com/JamesKennedyUK

https://soundcloud.com/jameskennedyuk

www.facebook.com/JamesKennedyUK

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